Building a well-lived life

A big driver for the FIRE movement is the freedom to choose how you spend your time. As I get older, I realize how very important this is. In my twenties, I was so busy working and raising my young family that it never occurred to me that time is the most valuable resource in the world. It’s the one thing you can’t buy more of, no matter how rich you are. (Ask Steve Jobs and Paul Allen). You can always buy more “stuff”, but you can’t buy more time.

Given that our time in this world is finite, the most important goal is making the most of the time we have. That means different things to different people. For me, it means having the freedom to spend time with my family, to read, learn, cook, go out with friends, travel , and enjoy the beauty of the world around me. And, yes, I’m simultaneously¬† working on becoming the best version of myself that I can be, though I’m still working out exactly what that means. (And, I don’t have to be retired to do that).

There has been an explosion of books written on happiness over the past 10 years or so. I think happiness is an extremely personal pursuit, and I agree with the literature that it is unlikely to be found in more money, more “stuff” (which often just becomes clutter), or even in more experiences. Once you’re past the first couple levels of Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs, you can focus on the things that truly make you happy. As far as FIRE is concerned, I think it’s important to have that worked out before you’re retired. If you are unhappy working a 9-to-5 job, especially if your unhappiness is broader than employment, having more time will only result in more time to focus on your unhappiness.

Start building a well-lived life now, regardless of where you are in your FIRE journey. None of us has the luxury of waiting. “Some day” might be too late.

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